Atitlon

Jeremy Khoo

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You never stand in the same river twice:
water flows ever onwards, ever careless;
no consequence except consequence itself.
I tried, once, up to my chest in a stream,
to hold on to it, but my grasp only tightened.

Stay a while longer – look, there:
the diminishing light; the remains of the day.
Although I have fought the good fight –
although I have tilted mightily
on the field of this grand contest –
although I have exulted in victory,
been sullen in defeat, striven
to overcome adversity, made merry
with friends, loved, and lost,
lost love, and loved what was lost –
still shall I turn to you
at close of day, glumly lit
by grey and gloomy skies, and say:
“I have seen everything that is done under the sun;
and behold, all is vanity and a striving after wind.”


*Jeremy is a philosophy undergraduate at Cambridge University interested in questions of morality.


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