My Third Hand

Theoni Androulidaki


The artist is drawing not just from his command of the medium, but from the struggle to control his tools, a willingness to combat oppression and violence with laughter.




This is what Klee means for me, since from him I am learning that is not only the creation that matters, but the process of creating, too, if not mainly. That’s what Guston tried to encompass with his ‘third hand’, this external presence, which interferes with the thoughts and decisions of the artist and exists within the piece itself. It provokes a form of ecstasy, a place where the artist loses herself in her process – or maybe truly discovering herself. Released from the everyday defenses or else oppression of self and into a totally different reality, the artist can create with heart, gut, spirit.


To try and immerse myself into this experience consciously would be a lost cause, as the third hands requires from the artist to be completely self-unconscious. Yet fragments of this state can be later retrieved and reflected upon. And I think this is what I did in this piece. I worked with different materials and techniques; I used a tree trunk, to make prints in a piece of paper. On the prints I painted with acrylics, changing the original sizes and dimensions. I took pictures of them, I distorted them, I edited them. The soundtrack to this, the music from my headphones, with no particular purpose in mind, but for this absorption.




My Third Hand resulted in a depiction of the connection between the material world, the individual and the thread linking them.

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